Little Booklet
I am a Kelsey. This is not my natural habitat.
Nerdfighters, DFTBA!
Little Booklet
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asylum-art:

This 144-Year-Old Wisteria In Japan Looks Like A Pink Sky 
These stunning photographs, which look like a glorious late evening sky with dashes of pink and purple, are actually pictures of Japan’s largest wisteria (or wistaria, depending on whom you ask) plant.
This plant, located in Ashikaga Flower Park in Japan, is certainly not the largest in the world, but it still comes in at an impressive 1,990 square meters (or half an acre) and dates back to around 1870 (the largest, at about 4,000 square meters, is the wisteria vine in Sierra Madre, California). Although wisterias can look like trees, they’re actually vines. Because its vines have the potential to get very heavy, this plant’s entire structure is held up on steel supports, allowing visitors to walk below its canopy and bask in the pink and purple light cast by its beautiful hanging blossoms.
Image credits: Takao Tsushima
asylum-art:

This 144-Year-Old Wisteria In Japan Looks Like A Pink Sky 
These stunning photographs, which look like a glorious late evening sky with dashes of pink and purple, are actually pictures of Japan’s largest wisteria (or wistaria, depending on whom you ask) plant.
This plant, located in Ashikaga Flower Park in Japan, is certainly not the largest in the world, but it still comes in at an impressive 1,990 square meters (or half an acre) and dates back to around 1870 (the largest, at about 4,000 square meters, is the wisteria vine in Sierra Madre, California). Although wisterias can look like trees, they’re actually vines. Because its vines have the potential to get very heavy, this plant’s entire structure is held up on steel supports, allowing visitors to walk below its canopy and bask in the pink and purple light cast by its beautiful hanging blossoms.
Image credits: Takao Tsushima
asylum-art:

This 144-Year-Old Wisteria In Japan Looks Like A Pink Sky 
These stunning photographs, which look like a glorious late evening sky with dashes of pink and purple, are actually pictures of Japan’s largest wisteria (or wistaria, depending on whom you ask) plant.
This plant, located in Ashikaga Flower Park in Japan, is certainly not the largest in the world, but it still comes in at an impressive 1,990 square meters (or half an acre) and dates back to around 1870 (the largest, at about 4,000 square meters, is the wisteria vine in Sierra Madre, California). Although wisterias can look like trees, they’re actually vines. Because its vines have the potential to get very heavy, this plant’s entire structure is held up on steel supports, allowing visitors to walk below its canopy and bask in the pink and purple light cast by its beautiful hanging blossoms.
Image credits: Takao Tsushima
asylum-art:

This 144-Year-Old Wisteria In Japan Looks Like A Pink Sky 
These stunning photographs, which look like a glorious late evening sky with dashes of pink and purple, are actually pictures of Japan’s largest wisteria (or wistaria, depending on whom you ask) plant.
This plant, located in Ashikaga Flower Park in Japan, is certainly not the largest in the world, but it still comes in at an impressive 1,990 square meters (or half an acre) and dates back to around 1870 (the largest, at about 4,000 square meters, is the wisteria vine in Sierra Madre, California). Although wisterias can look like trees, they’re actually vines. Because its vines have the potential to get very heavy, this plant’s entire structure is held up on steel supports, allowing visitors to walk below its canopy and bask in the pink and purple light cast by its beautiful hanging blossoms.
Image credits: Takao Tsushima
asylum-art:

This 144-Year-Old Wisteria In Japan Looks Like A Pink Sky 
These stunning photographs, which look like a glorious late evening sky with dashes of pink and purple, are actually pictures of Japan’s largest wisteria (or wistaria, depending on whom you ask) plant.
This plant, located in Ashikaga Flower Park in Japan, is certainly not the largest in the world, but it still comes in at an impressive 1,990 square meters (or half an acre) and dates back to around 1870 (the largest, at about 4,000 square meters, is the wisteria vine in Sierra Madre, California). Although wisterias can look like trees, they’re actually vines. Because its vines have the potential to get very heavy, this plant’s entire structure is held up on steel supports, allowing visitors to walk below its canopy and bask in the pink and purple light cast by its beautiful hanging blossoms.
Image credits: Takao Tsushima
asylum-art:

This 144-Year-Old Wisteria In Japan Looks Like A Pink Sky 
These stunning photographs, which look like a glorious late evening sky with dashes of pink and purple, are actually pictures of Japan’s largest wisteria (or wistaria, depending on whom you ask) plant.
This plant, located in Ashikaga Flower Park in Japan, is certainly not the largest in the world, but it still comes in at an impressive 1,990 square meters (or half an acre) and dates back to around 1870 (the largest, at about 4,000 square meters, is the wisteria vine in Sierra Madre, California). Although wisterias can look like trees, they’re actually vines. Because its vines have the potential to get very heavy, this plant’s entire structure is held up on steel supports, allowing visitors to walk below its canopy and bask in the pink and purple light cast by its beautiful hanging blossoms.
Image credits: Takao Tsushima
asylum-art:

This 144-Year-Old Wisteria In Japan Looks Like A Pink Sky 
These stunning photographs, which look like a glorious late evening sky with dashes of pink and purple, are actually pictures of Japan’s largest wisteria (or wistaria, depending on whom you ask) plant.
This plant, located in Ashikaga Flower Park in Japan, is certainly not the largest in the world, but it still comes in at an impressive 1,990 square meters (or half an acre) and dates back to around 1870 (the largest, at about 4,000 square meters, is the wisteria vine in Sierra Madre, California). Although wisterias can look like trees, they’re actually vines. Because its vines have the potential to get very heavy, this plant’s entire structure is held up on steel supports, allowing visitors to walk below its canopy and bask in the pink and purple light cast by its beautiful hanging blossoms.
Image credits: Takao Tsushima
asylum-art:

This 144-Year-Old Wisteria In Japan Looks Like A Pink Sky 
These stunning photographs, which look like a glorious late evening sky with dashes of pink and purple, are actually pictures of Japan’s largest wisteria (or wistaria, depending on whom you ask) plant.
This plant, located in Ashikaga Flower Park in Japan, is certainly not the largest in the world, but it still comes in at an impressive 1,990 square meters (or half an acre) and dates back to around 1870 (the largest, at about 4,000 square meters, is the wisteria vine in Sierra Madre, California). Although wisterias can look like trees, they’re actually vines. Because its vines have the potential to get very heavy, this plant’s entire structure is held up on steel supports, allowing visitors to walk below its canopy and bask in the pink and purple light cast by its beautiful hanging blossoms.
Image credits: Takao Tsushima
asylum-art:

This 144-Year-Old Wisteria In Japan Looks Like A Pink Sky 
These stunning photographs, which look like a glorious late evening sky with dashes of pink and purple, are actually pictures of Japan’s largest wisteria (or wistaria, depending on whom you ask) plant.
This plant, located in Ashikaga Flower Park in Japan, is certainly not the largest in the world, but it still comes in at an impressive 1,990 square meters (or half an acre) and dates back to around 1870 (the largest, at about 4,000 square meters, is the wisteria vine in Sierra Madre, California). Although wisterias can look like trees, they’re actually vines. Because its vines have the potential to get very heavy, this plant’s entire structure is held up on steel supports, allowing visitors to walk below its canopy and bask in the pink and purple light cast by its beautiful hanging blossoms.
Image credits: Takao Tsushima
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"

Reading insecurity. It is the subjective experience of thinking that you’re not getting as much from reading as you used to. It is setting aside an hour for that new book … and spending it instead on Facebook (scrolling dumbly through photos of people you barely remember from your high school). It is deploring your attention span and missing the flow, the trance, of entering a narrative world without bringing the real one along. It is realizing that if Virginia Woolf was correct to call heaven “one continuous unexhausted reading,” then goodbye, you have been kicked out of paradise.

[…]

So where does this leave us…? I would not turn back the clock on the Internet, obviously. I am not stupid enough to question the tremendous good it does, even if at times I stare at my computer screen and feel like a water strider posed tantalizingly atop a stream of inaccessible knowledge… And yet. I worry that, over the past few years of living much of my life online, my relationship to text—especially the spacious, get-lost-in-it kind—has changed for the worse. It’s called reading insecurity. Do you have it?

"
Slate's Katy Waldman considers the modern existential malady of “reading insecurity,” caused largely by our inability to cultivate a truly “bi-literate” brain. (via explore-blog)
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kittydoom:

exgynocraticgrrl:


Breaking The Male Code: After Steubenville, A Call To Action

 (Left to Right): Peter Buffett, Jimmie Briggs, Joe Ehrmann, Tony Porter, Dave Zirin and Moderator Eve Ensler.



MIC DROP
kittydoom:

exgynocraticgrrl:


Breaking The Male Code: After Steubenville, A Call To Action

 (Left to Right): Peter Buffett, Jimmie Briggs, Joe Ehrmann, Tony Porter, Dave Zirin and Moderator Eve Ensler.



MIC DROP
kittydoom:

exgynocraticgrrl:


Breaking The Male Code: After Steubenville, A Call To Action

 (Left to Right): Peter Buffett, Jimmie Briggs, Joe Ehrmann, Tony Porter, Dave Zirin and Moderator Eve Ensler.



MIC DROP
kittydoom:

exgynocraticgrrl:


Breaking The Male Code: After Steubenville, A Call To Action

 (Left to Right): Peter Buffett, Jimmie Briggs, Joe Ehrmann, Tony Porter, Dave Zirin and Moderator Eve Ensler.



MIC DROP
kittydoom:

exgynocraticgrrl:


Breaking The Male Code: After Steubenville, A Call To Action

 (Left to Right): Peter Buffett, Jimmie Briggs, Joe Ehrmann, Tony Porter, Dave Zirin and Moderator Eve Ensler.



MIC DROP
kittydoom:

exgynocraticgrrl:


Breaking The Male Code: After Steubenville, A Call To Action

 (Left to Right): Peter Buffett, Jimmie Briggs, Joe Ehrmann, Tony Porter, Dave Zirin and Moderator Eve Ensler.



MIC DROP
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booksnbuildings:

View of Florence, fresco 1352
(Detail of the Bigallo Madonna della Misericordia)
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likeafieldmouse:

Onfim (1220 AD)
"One of the most fascinating archeological finds in Russia has been the discovery of hundreds of birchbark documents (messages written on the bark of birch trees with a sharp stylus) that were created from the 11th to the 15th century.
The birchbark documents of Novgorod are a major source for information about life in Medieval Novgorod because they are not the writings of church theologians or political leaders, but rather, personal messages, IOUs, love letters, shopping lists, and so on.
One of the most fascinating items is a collection of children’s drawings that have been unearthed.
How could they have survived to the present day? After all, finger paints, magic markers, and crayons were not yet in use, paper was far too valuable a commodity to waste on children… Most of the products of childhood inspiration probably were expressed on the ephemeral canvas of dirt or sand.
But birchbark was a different story. The bark was widely available and easily cultivated. Anyone could use it. When one was finished with the message, it was simply thrown into the mud, where the presence of water and clay created an unusually bacteria-free environment which preserved the documents. 
The drawings from Novgorod appear to all have come from a Russian boy named Onfim, who lived at the end of the 12th century or beginning of the 13th century in the city of Novgorod.
By the estimate of the archaeologists who unearthed his works, he was around seven years old at the time that he made these drawings.”
…..
In the first image above, “Onfim started to write out the first 11 letters of the alphabet in the upper right corner, but got bored and drew a picture of himself as a grown-up warrior impaling an enemy with his spear. To remove any doubt about the identity of the warrior, he even labeled the person on the horse as Onfim.” 
In the last image above, where you can see the original birchbark, Onfim ”drew a picture of himself as a wild beast (which he identified by writing I am a wild beast over it). The apparently friendly beast carries a sign which reads Greetings from Onfim to Danilo – Danilo (or Daniel) presumably being Onfim’s schoolmate.”
likeafieldmouse:

Onfim (1220 AD)
"One of the most fascinating archeological finds in Russia has been the discovery of hundreds of birchbark documents (messages written on the bark of birch trees with a sharp stylus) that were created from the 11th to the 15th century.
The birchbark documents of Novgorod are a major source for information about life in Medieval Novgorod because they are not the writings of church theologians or political leaders, but rather, personal messages, IOUs, love letters, shopping lists, and so on.
One of the most fascinating items is a collection of children’s drawings that have been unearthed.
How could they have survived to the present day? After all, finger paints, magic markers, and crayons were not yet in use, paper was far too valuable a commodity to waste on children… Most of the products of childhood inspiration probably were expressed on the ephemeral canvas of dirt or sand.
But birchbark was a different story. The bark was widely available and easily cultivated. Anyone could use it. When one was finished with the message, it was simply thrown into the mud, where the presence of water and clay created an unusually bacteria-free environment which preserved the documents. 
The drawings from Novgorod appear to all have come from a Russian boy named Onfim, who lived at the end of the 12th century or beginning of the 13th century in the city of Novgorod.
By the estimate of the archaeologists who unearthed his works, he was around seven years old at the time that he made these drawings.”
…..
In the first image above, “Onfim started to write out the first 11 letters of the alphabet in the upper right corner, but got bored and drew a picture of himself as a grown-up warrior impaling an enemy with his spear. To remove any doubt about the identity of the warrior, he even labeled the person on the horse as Onfim.” 
In the last image above, where you can see the original birchbark, Onfim ”drew a picture of himself as a wild beast (which he identified by writing I am a wild beast over it). The apparently friendly beast carries a sign which reads Greetings from Onfim to Danilo – Danilo (or Daniel) presumably being Onfim’s schoolmate.”
likeafieldmouse:

Onfim (1220 AD)
"One of the most fascinating archeological finds in Russia has been the discovery of hundreds of birchbark documents (messages written on the bark of birch trees with a sharp stylus) that were created from the 11th to the 15th century.
The birchbark documents of Novgorod are a major source for information about life in Medieval Novgorod because they are not the writings of church theologians or political leaders, but rather, personal messages, IOUs, love letters, shopping lists, and so on.
One of the most fascinating items is a collection of children’s drawings that have been unearthed.
How could they have survived to the present day? After all, finger paints, magic markers, and crayons were not yet in use, paper was far too valuable a commodity to waste on children… Most of the products of childhood inspiration probably were expressed on the ephemeral canvas of dirt or sand.
But birchbark was a different story. The bark was widely available and easily cultivated. Anyone could use it. When one was finished with the message, it was simply thrown into the mud, where the presence of water and clay created an unusually bacteria-free environment which preserved the documents. 
The drawings from Novgorod appear to all have come from a Russian boy named Onfim, who lived at the end of the 12th century or beginning of the 13th century in the city of Novgorod.
By the estimate of the archaeologists who unearthed his works, he was around seven years old at the time that he made these drawings.”
…..
In the first image above, “Onfim started to write out the first 11 letters of the alphabet in the upper right corner, but got bored and drew a picture of himself as a grown-up warrior impaling an enemy with his spear. To remove any doubt about the identity of the warrior, he even labeled the person on the horse as Onfim.” 
In the last image above, where you can see the original birchbark, Onfim ”drew a picture of himself as a wild beast (which he identified by writing I am a wild beast over it). The apparently friendly beast carries a sign which reads Greetings from Onfim to Danilo – Danilo (or Daniel) presumably being Onfim’s schoolmate.”
likeafieldmouse:

Onfim (1220 AD)
"One of the most fascinating archeological finds in Russia has been the discovery of hundreds of birchbark documents (messages written on the bark of birch trees with a sharp stylus) that were created from the 11th to the 15th century.
The birchbark documents of Novgorod are a major source for information about life in Medieval Novgorod because they are not the writings of church theologians or political leaders, but rather, personal messages, IOUs, love letters, shopping lists, and so on.
One of the most fascinating items is a collection of children’s drawings that have been unearthed.
How could they have survived to the present day? After all, finger paints, magic markers, and crayons were not yet in use, paper was far too valuable a commodity to waste on children… Most of the products of childhood inspiration probably were expressed on the ephemeral canvas of dirt or sand.
But birchbark was a different story. The bark was widely available and easily cultivated. Anyone could use it. When one was finished with the message, it was simply thrown into the mud, where the presence of water and clay created an unusually bacteria-free environment which preserved the documents. 
The drawings from Novgorod appear to all have come from a Russian boy named Onfim, who lived at the end of the 12th century or beginning of the 13th century in the city of Novgorod.
By the estimate of the archaeologists who unearthed his works, he was around seven years old at the time that he made these drawings.”
…..
In the first image above, “Onfim started to write out the first 11 letters of the alphabet in the upper right corner, but got bored and drew a picture of himself as a grown-up warrior impaling an enemy with his spear. To remove any doubt about the identity of the warrior, he even labeled the person on the horse as Onfim.” 
In the last image above, where you can see the original birchbark, Onfim ”drew a picture of himself as a wild beast (which he identified by writing I am a wild beast over it). The apparently friendly beast carries a sign which reads Greetings from Onfim to Danilo – Danilo (or Daniel) presumably being Onfim’s schoolmate.”
likeafieldmouse:

Onfim (1220 AD)
"One of the most fascinating archeological finds in Russia has been the discovery of hundreds of birchbark documents (messages written on the bark of birch trees with a sharp stylus) that were created from the 11th to the 15th century.
The birchbark documents of Novgorod are a major source for information about life in Medieval Novgorod because they are not the writings of church theologians or political leaders, but rather, personal messages, IOUs, love letters, shopping lists, and so on.
One of the most fascinating items is a collection of children’s drawings that have been unearthed.
How could they have survived to the present day? After all, finger paints, magic markers, and crayons were not yet in use, paper was far too valuable a commodity to waste on children… Most of the products of childhood inspiration probably were expressed on the ephemeral canvas of dirt or sand.
But birchbark was a different story. The bark was widely available and easily cultivated. Anyone could use it. When one was finished with the message, it was simply thrown into the mud, where the presence of water and clay created an unusually bacteria-free environment which preserved the documents. 
The drawings from Novgorod appear to all have come from a Russian boy named Onfim, who lived at the end of the 12th century or beginning of the 13th century in the city of Novgorod.
By the estimate of the archaeologists who unearthed his works, he was around seven years old at the time that he made these drawings.”
…..
In the first image above, “Onfim started to write out the first 11 letters of the alphabet in the upper right corner, but got bored and drew a picture of himself as a grown-up warrior impaling an enemy with his spear. To remove any doubt about the identity of the warrior, he even labeled the person on the horse as Onfim.” 
In the last image above, where you can see the original birchbark, Onfim ”drew a picture of himself as a wild beast (which he identified by writing I am a wild beast over it). The apparently friendly beast carries a sign which reads Greetings from Onfim to Danilo – Danilo (or Daniel) presumably being Onfim’s schoolmate.”
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"You guys know about vampires? … You know, vampires have no reflections in a mirror? There’s this idea that monsters don’t have reflections in a mirror. And what I’ve always thought isn’t that monsters don’t have reflections in a mirror. It’s that if you want to make a human being into a monster, deny them, at the cultural level, any reflection of themselves. And growing up, I felt like a monster in some ways. I didn’t see myself reflected at all."
Junot Díaz on race and representation in media (via medievalpoc)
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elenamorelli:

{ the sky below }
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sosuperawesome:

Postcards by Nicole Gustafsson aka nimasprout on Etsy
sosuperawesome:

Postcards by Nicole Gustafsson aka nimasprout on Etsy
sosuperawesome:

Postcards by Nicole Gustafsson aka nimasprout on Etsy
sosuperawesome:

Postcards by Nicole Gustafsson aka nimasprout on Etsy
sosuperawesome:

Postcards by Nicole Gustafsson aka nimasprout on Etsy
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artgiants:

Alice and Martin Provensen
artgiants:

Alice and Martin Provensen
artgiants:

Alice and Martin Provensen
artgiants:

Alice and Martin Provensen
artgiants:

Alice and Martin Provensen
artgiants:

Alice and Martin Provensen
artgiants:

Alice and Martin Provensen
artgiants:

Alice and Martin Provensen
artgiants:

Alice and Martin Provensen
artgiants:

Alice and Martin Provensen
Biloela - Wild Cockatoos Archives - Leila Jeffreys
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ideasandinaction:

Szeged Synagogue. Hungary
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septagonstudios:

Christian Schloe
THE BOTANIST’S DAUGHTER
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Q: I'm writing a paper about the internalized racism in Shakespeare's Othello. Do you have any good sources about the Elizabethan interactions with people of color that can give me some context for this play? I asked my professor but he gave me the "there were no african peoples (Moors or otherwise) in England in this time period" spiel, but I'm sensing bullshit. Thank you!
Asked by timballisto
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way-harsh-tai:

Everything Beyonce does is careful and thought out. Her entire image is perfection crafted from planning ahead. She does not ‘wing it’ or throw things into her performances and public appearances ‘just because’.
What she did at this award show was amazing, especially because of how intentional and thought out it clearly was.
Feminism is a scary word for a lot of people. Many women are afraid of calling themselves feminist because they think it implies anger, hatred of men, or a rejection of traditional femininity. 
Beyonce presented everyone watching with two distinct images of what many viewers viewed as two very different women. There is the strong, independent FEMINIST. She is the woman who likes being in control and being in the spotlight. Then there is the WIFE and MOTHER. She is soft, sweet, smiling at the husband and child you can tell she loves and values so much.
For every girl watching who was afraid to be a feminist, afraid to be powerful, because of what she thought she would lose, this is an incredible message. You can be all the things you want to be. You can be both. Feminists can have amazing happy, full lives full of both traditional and modern womanhood. 
Feminism means gender should not be a source of persecution or a restriction of your choices. Feminism mean the type of person you should be is based on what you value, not what outside forces pressure you to value because of your gender or biological sex. Shout at the top of your lungs that you are a feminist and proud. Then go and be the exact person that you want to be. 
way-harsh-tai:

Everything Beyonce does is careful and thought out. Her entire image is perfection crafted from planning ahead. She does not ‘wing it’ or throw things into her performances and public appearances ‘just because’.
What she did at this award show was amazing, especially because of how intentional and thought out it clearly was.
Feminism is a scary word for a lot of people. Many women are afraid of calling themselves feminist because they think it implies anger, hatred of men, or a rejection of traditional femininity. 
Beyonce presented everyone watching with two distinct images of what many viewers viewed as two very different women. There is the strong, independent FEMINIST. She is the woman who likes being in control and being in the spotlight. Then there is the WIFE and MOTHER. She is soft, sweet, smiling at the husband and child you can tell she loves and values so much.
For every girl watching who was afraid to be a feminist, afraid to be powerful, because of what she thought she would lose, this is an incredible message. You can be all the things you want to be. You can be both. Feminists can have amazing happy, full lives full of both traditional and modern womanhood. 
Feminism means gender should not be a source of persecution or a restriction of your choices. Feminism mean the type of person you should be is based on what you value, not what outside forces pressure you to value because of your gender or biological sex. Shout at the top of your lungs that you are a feminist and proud. Then go and be the exact person that you want to be.