Little Booklet
I am a Kelsey. This is not my natural habitat.
Nerdfighters, DFTBA!
Little Booklet
+
ABOUT THE RECENT EVENTS CONCERNING YOUTUBE
+
+
4pologetic:

mackenzies by deeancross on Flickr.
+
azertip:

Alexis Liddell 
azertip:

Alexis Liddell 
azertip:

Alexis Liddell 
azertip:

Alexis Liddell 
azertip:

Alexis Liddell 
azertip:

Alexis Liddell 
azertip:

Alexis Liddell 
+
geometrymatters:

Complex works of the Venezuelan artist Rafael Araujo
http://www.rafael-araujo.com/calculo_ing.html
geometrymatters:

Complex works of the Venezuelan artist Rafael Araujo
http://www.rafael-araujo.com/calculo_ing.html
geometrymatters:

Complex works of the Venezuelan artist Rafael Araujo
http://www.rafael-araujo.com/calculo_ing.html
geometrymatters:

Complex works of the Venezuelan artist Rafael Araujo
http://www.rafael-araujo.com/calculo_ing.html
geometrymatters:

Complex works of the Venezuelan artist Rafael Araujo
http://www.rafael-araujo.com/calculo_ing.html
geometrymatters:

Complex works of the Venezuelan artist Rafael Araujo
http://www.rafael-araujo.com/calculo_ing.html
geometrymatters:

Complex works of the Venezuelan artist Rafael Araujo
http://www.rafael-araujo.com/calculo_ing.html
geometrymatters:

Complex works of the Venezuelan artist Rafael Araujo
http://www.rafael-araujo.com/calculo_ing.html
+
"Yesterday, I spent 60 dollars on groceries,
took the bus home,
carried both bags with two good arms back to my studio apartment
and cooked myself dinner.
You and I may have different definitions of a good day.
This week, I paid my rent and my credit card bill,
worked 60 hours between my two jobs,
only saw the sun on my cigarette breaks
and slept like a rock.
Flossed in the morning,
locked my door,
and remembered to buy eggs.
My mother is proud of me.
It is not the kind of pride she brags about at the golf course.
She doesn’t combat topics like, ”My daughter got into Yale”
with, ”Oh yeah, my daughter remembered to buy eggs”
But she is proud.
See, she remembers what came before this.
The weeks where I forgot how to use my muscles,
how I would stay as silent as a thick fog for weeks.
She thought each phone call from an unknown number was the notice of my suicide.
These were the bad days.
My life was a gift that I wanted to return.
My head was a house of leaking faucets and burnt-out lightbulbs.
Depression, is a good lover.
So attentive; has this innate way of making everything about you.
And it is easy to forget that your bedroom is not the world,
That the dark shadows your pain casts is not mood-lighting.
It is easier to stay in this abusive relationship than fix the problems it has created.
Today, I slept in until 10,
cleaned every dish I own,
fought with the bank,
took care of paperwork.
You and I might have different definitions of adulthood.
I don’t work for salary, I didn’t graduate from college,
but I don’t speak for others anymore,
and I don’t regret anything I can’t genuinely apologize for.
And my mother is proud of me.
I burned down a house of depression,
I painted over murals of greyscale,
and it was hard to rewrite my life into one I wanted to live
But today, I want to live.
I didn’t salivate over sharp knives,
or envy the boy who tossed himself off the Brooklyn bridge.
I just cleaned my bathroom,
did the laundry,
called my brother.
Told him, “it was a good day."
Kait Rokowski (A Good Day)
+
booksnbuildings:

"Matrakçı Nasuh was an Ottoman Renaissance man. He excelled in martial arts, mathematics, science, painting and literature, among other fields. Matrakçı Nasuh’s name, in fact, comes from the word for ‘cudgel’ or ‘mace’ in Ottoman Turkish, matrāḳ, as he was famous for his virtuosity in employing this weapon and creating games and military training involving the mace, as well as other weapons, even writing a work on the art of swordsmanship. 
In addition to his contribution to the writing of history and the creation of games with cudgels, Matrakçı Nasuh was also famous as a technician. The most well-known episode of his engineering talent occurred during the circumcision ceremonies of Süleyman’s sons, Mehmed and Selim, when he famously constructed two moving citadels out of paper from which soldiers emerged and staged a battle, as part of the public spectacle and celebration in the Istanbul hippodrome.
He was also a talented painter and created a new form of art that depicted the topography of cities of the Ottoman Empire with great precision and detail (pictured).”
Read more at the British Library.
booksnbuildings:

"Matrakçı Nasuh was an Ottoman Renaissance man. He excelled in martial arts, mathematics, science, painting and literature, among other fields. Matrakçı Nasuh’s name, in fact, comes from the word for ‘cudgel’ or ‘mace’ in Ottoman Turkish, matrāḳ, as he was famous for his virtuosity in employing this weapon and creating games and military training involving the mace, as well as other weapons, even writing a work on the art of swordsmanship. 
In addition to his contribution to the writing of history and the creation of games with cudgels, Matrakçı Nasuh was also famous as a technician. The most well-known episode of his engineering talent occurred during the circumcision ceremonies of Süleyman’s sons, Mehmed and Selim, when he famously constructed two moving citadels out of paper from which soldiers emerged and staged a battle, as part of the public spectacle and celebration in the Istanbul hippodrome.
He was also a talented painter and created a new form of art that depicted the topography of cities of the Ottoman Empire with great precision and detail (pictured).”
Read more at the British Library.
booksnbuildings:

"Matrakçı Nasuh was an Ottoman Renaissance man. He excelled in martial arts, mathematics, science, painting and literature, among other fields. Matrakçı Nasuh’s name, in fact, comes from the word for ‘cudgel’ or ‘mace’ in Ottoman Turkish, matrāḳ, as he was famous for his virtuosity in employing this weapon and creating games and military training involving the mace, as well as other weapons, even writing a work on the art of swordsmanship. 
In addition to his contribution to the writing of history and the creation of games with cudgels, Matrakçı Nasuh was also famous as a technician. The most well-known episode of his engineering talent occurred during the circumcision ceremonies of Süleyman’s sons, Mehmed and Selim, when he famously constructed two moving citadels out of paper from which soldiers emerged and staged a battle, as part of the public spectacle and celebration in the Istanbul hippodrome.
He was also a talented painter and created a new form of art that depicted the topography of cities of the Ottoman Empire with great precision and detail (pictured).”
Read more at the British Library.
booksnbuildings:

"Matrakçı Nasuh was an Ottoman Renaissance man. He excelled in martial arts, mathematics, science, painting and literature, among other fields. Matrakçı Nasuh’s name, in fact, comes from the word for ‘cudgel’ or ‘mace’ in Ottoman Turkish, matrāḳ, as he was famous for his virtuosity in employing this weapon and creating games and military training involving the mace, as well as other weapons, even writing a work on the art of swordsmanship. 
In addition to his contribution to the writing of history and the creation of games with cudgels, Matrakçı Nasuh was also famous as a technician. The most well-known episode of his engineering talent occurred during the circumcision ceremonies of Süleyman’s sons, Mehmed and Selim, when he famously constructed two moving citadels out of paper from which soldiers emerged and staged a battle, as part of the public spectacle and celebration in the Istanbul hippodrome.
He was also a talented painter and created a new form of art that depicted the topography of cities of the Ottoman Empire with great precision and detail (pictured).”
Read more at the British Library.
+

nature / vintage blog
+
+
+
jtotheizzoe:

scienceisbeauty:

Photographer Richard Barnes captures the mesmerizing geometric patterns created by flocks of European starlings.
Source: Beautiful and Eerie Photographs of Starlings in Flight (Smithsonian.com)

Feel the murmur(ation)
jtotheizzoe:

scienceisbeauty:

Photographer Richard Barnes captures the mesmerizing geometric patterns created by flocks of European starlings.
Source: Beautiful and Eerie Photographs of Starlings in Flight (Smithsonian.com)

Feel the murmur(ation)
jtotheizzoe:

scienceisbeauty:

Photographer Richard Barnes captures the mesmerizing geometric patterns created by flocks of European starlings.
Source: Beautiful and Eerie Photographs of Starlings in Flight (Smithsonian.com)

Feel the murmur(ation)
jtotheizzoe:

scienceisbeauty:

Photographer Richard Barnes captures the mesmerizing geometric patterns created by flocks of European starlings.
Source: Beautiful and Eerie Photographs of Starlings in Flight (Smithsonian.com)

Feel the murmur(ation)
jtotheizzoe:

scienceisbeauty:

Photographer Richard Barnes captures the mesmerizing geometric patterns created by flocks of European starlings.
Source: Beautiful and Eerie Photographs of Starlings in Flight (Smithsonian.com)

Feel the murmur(ation)
jtotheizzoe:

scienceisbeauty:

Photographer Richard Barnes captures the mesmerizing geometric patterns created by flocks of European starlings.
Source: Beautiful and Eerie Photographs of Starlings in Flight (Smithsonian.com)

Feel the murmur(ation)
+
+
"‎’Slut’ is attacking women for their right to say yes. ‘Friend Zone’ is attacking women for their right to say no."
And “bitch” is attacking women for their right to call you on it (via moldmaiden)
+
rosalarian:

Feminism is having a wardrobe malfunction.
Does your brand of feminism remove barriers for women, or simply move them around? Does is expand options for women, or does it just shift them? You don’t liberate women by forcing them to choose option B instead of option A. What is comfortable for you might not be comfortable for someone else, and it’s entirely possible that what you see as oppressive, other women find comfortable or even downright liberating.
Before you think the girl in the middle is a strawman, let me tell you I used to be her, back in my misguided youth. I considered myself the standard to which other people should adhere. But that was stupid. It’s not up to me to tell people how to dress, and it’s much nicer to let everyone choose for themselves.
Some women would feel naked without a veil. Some women would find it restrictive. Some women would feel restricted by a bra. Some women would feel naked without one. Some women would feel restricted by a tight corset. Others love them. Some wear lots of clothes with a corset. Some only wear the corset and nothing else. What makes any article of clothing oppressive is someone forcing you to wear it. And it’s just as oppressive to force someone not to wear something that they want to wear.
rosalarian:

Feminism is having a wardrobe malfunction.
Does your brand of feminism remove barriers for women, or simply move them around? Does is expand options for women, or does it just shift them? You don’t liberate women by forcing them to choose option B instead of option A. What is comfortable for you might not be comfortable for someone else, and it’s entirely possible that what you see as oppressive, other women find comfortable or even downright liberating.
Before you think the girl in the middle is a strawman, let me tell you I used to be her, back in my misguided youth. I considered myself the standard to which other people should adhere. But that was stupid. It’s not up to me to tell people how to dress, and it’s much nicer to let everyone choose for themselves.
Some women would feel naked without a veil. Some women would find it restrictive. Some women would feel restricted by a bra. Some women would feel naked without one. Some women would feel restricted by a tight corset. Others love them. Some wear lots of clothes with a corset. Some only wear the corset and nothing else. What makes any article of clothing oppressive is someone forcing you to wear it. And it’s just as oppressive to force someone not to wear something that they want to wear.